Crew Roles:

The following is a list of crew roles in filmmaking,

Directing

The Director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film’s plot, directing the performances of Actors, organizing and selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film’s soundtrack. Though directors wield a great deal of power, they are ultimately subordinate to the film’s Producer or Producers. Some Directors, especially more established ones, take on many of the roles of a Producer, and the distinction between the two roles is sometimes blurred.
The First Assistant Director (1st AD) assists the Production Manager and Director. The ultimate aim of any 1st AD is to ensure the film comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in which the Director, principal artists (Actors) and crew can be focused on their work. They oversee day-to-day management of the cast and crew scheduling, equipment, script, and set. A 1st AD may also be responsible for directing background action for major shots or the entirety of relatively minor shots, at the Director’s discretion.

The Second Assistant Director (2nd AD) is the chief assistant of the 1st AD and helps carry out those tasks delegated to the 1st AD. The 2nd AD may also direct background action andextras in addition to helping the 1st AD with scheduling, booking, etc. The 2nd AD is responsible for creating Call Sheets that let the crew know the schedule and important details about the shooting day. In Canadian and British functional structures there are 3rd ADs and even Trainee ADs; in the American system there are 2nd 2nd ADs.

I have had experience officially as a director but unoffically I have had experience as a 1st and 2nd AD, I feel I have skills to jump into any 2nd AD or trainee AD role. 1st AD’s and Directorial roles would depend on the size and scale of the project.
The term Cinematographer has been a point of contention for some time now. It is usually synonymous with Director of Photography, though some professionals insist this only applies when the Director of Photography and Camera Operator are the same person.
The Director of Photography, DoP or DP, is the chief of the camera and lighting crew of the film. The DoP makes decisions on lighting and framing of scenes in conjunction with the film’s director. Typically, the Director tells the DoP how he or she wants a shot to look, and the DoP chooses the correct aperture, filter, and lighting to achieve the desired effect as per the Director’s requirements.
The Camera Operator uses the camera at the direction of the Cinematographer, Director of Photography, or the film Director to capture the scenes on film. Generally, a Cinematographer or Director of Photography does not operate the camera, but sometimes these jobs may be combined.
The First Assistant Camera, 1st AC or Focus Puller, is responsible for keeping the camera in focus as it is shooting, as well as building the camera at the beginning of the day and taking it apart at the end. They also thread the film when a new magazine is loaded.
The Second Assistant Camera, 2nd AC or Clapper loader, operates the clapperboard at the beginning of each take and loads the raw film stock into the camera magazines between takes, if there is no additional specifically designated Film Loader. The 2nd AC is also in charge of overseeing the meticulously kept notebooks that record when the film stock is received, used, and sent to the lab for processing. Additionally, the 2nd AC oversees organization of camera equipment and transport of the equipment from one shooting location to another.
  • Film Loader
The Loader transfers motion picture film from the manufacturer’s light-tight canisters to the camera magazines for attachment to the camera by the 2nd AC. After exposure during filming, the Loader then removes the film from the magazines and places it back into the light-tight cans for transport to the laboratory. It is the responsibility of the Loader to manage the inventory of film and communicate with the 1st AC on the film usage and remaining stock throughout the day. On small production crews, this job is often combined with the 2nd AC. With the prevalence of digital photography, this role is taken on by the Digital Imaging Technician.
  • Camera Production Assistant
The Camera PA, Camera Intern or Camera Trainee, assists the crew while learning the trade of the Camera Assistant, Operator or Cinematographer.
On digital photography productions the Digital Imaging Technician, or DIT, is responsible for the coordination of the internal workings of the digital camera. Under the direction of the Cinematographer or Director of Photography, the DIT will make adjustments to the multitude of variables available in most professional digital cameras to creatively or technically manipulate the resulting image. It may also be the responsibility of the DIT to archive and manage the digital data, create compressed dailies from raw footage and prepare all digital images for post-production.
  • Steadicam Operator
A Steadicam Operator is someone who is skilled at operating a Steadicam (trademark for a camera stabilization rig). This person is usually one of the Camera Operators on the production.
  • Motion Control Technician/Operator

This Technician operates a motion control rig, which essentially is a ‘camera robot’ able to consistently repeat camera moves for special effects uses.“Motion Control Frequently Asked Questions”. Mark Robert’s Motion Control. Retrieved 2010-09-19. Motion control rigs are typically rented with an experienced operator.

I see myself as a camera operator, I am a good DOP but I understand that I am not a fantastic one. I still need a little bit of guidance, I don’t always have the intuitive to make major decisions when it comes to camera. This will come in time and I have already seen how much my skills and reactions have improved in repeated shoots.
I have also tried my hand at producing and I feel my skills are not bad in this area. However I find myself getting easily stressed in this role, I don’t see this area as a future career path but I have skills to use when required.
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